Your Pets Are Tired of You

Your Pets Are Tired of You

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Your pet wants you to go back to work.

Like at the office. All day. Seriously. Right now.

It’s been a year now and you’ve completely fucked up their routine. You’ve disrupted their sleep cycle (which is 98% of their day) by sleeping in their bed(s). You’re noisy, rude and inconsiderate because yes, they ARE your “best doggy” / “Missy Fluffy” and no, they do not need a belly rub right now. They want to take a 10 hour nap. LEAVE.

Also, you’re a slob. When you yell: “Look at me! I just had a ZOOM meeting! ALL BY MYSELF!” they politely point their noses at the sweats you’re wearing. You know, the really comfy ones? That you’ve been wearing for four days now? Those. Mr. Tech Genius. Christ.

Just because you’ve given up, does not mean that your pet has to as well. And frankly, your embarrassing them in front of their friends. It’s cool if you decided to wear THIS while out for a walk, but they have some standards. Socks with Crocs? Mother of God.

 

To make this easier on you, we’ve put together a snappy little collection we like to call the Self-Respecting Pet Collection.

Each item is fully customizable and can feature your pet’s chosen design or we can search for one. Of course, it can contain witty quotes from Fluffy’s favorite writer, pictures Buddy has of him running on the beach during happier days or even Fido & Coco nuzzling together on their own custom-made bed. With a blanket over their heads. Trying to ignore you.

Wouldn’t your work day be so much nicer if your pet didn’t have a lingering feeling of animosity and dismissal?

Yes. Yes, it would be. Finish up your little PowerPoint thing and let’s go.

They’re not going anywhere.

COVID Pushes Ecomm Over the Top

COVID Pushes Ecomm Over the Top

Societies do not change gracefully. Behind major shifts in how humans go about their days often stand unspeakably horrid events: war, plague, famine, flood.

When the shit hits the fan, we deploy all of our technologies to mitigate the disaster. Medically, that translates into vaccines and healthcare systems. In times of natural disaster, we call up the engineers and first-responders.

The current crisis has forced us to shift as a planet in multiple ways. One of the most prominent economic shifts is in consumer behavior. The changes are significant, real and much more substantial than we think.

Are These Numbers For Real?

It’s a black ribbon medal, for sure. But ecommerce has arrived. No longer an oddity or an alternate, it is now required to be online, either as a consumer or a retailer. This one graph pretty well sums it up:

cgk.ink | ecommerce growth

That’s impressive growth on any level. But the percentage increases become ridiculously large when you start looking at a few industries. Obviously, we know the losers (aviation, hospitality, etc.) but there are some surprising winners. Chiefly among them is an industry I focus on a lot: Print on Demand (PoD).

“It was almost a straight line up when people were scrambling to shift from traditional production to on-demand,” says Brian Rainey, CEO of Gooten, a print-on-demand logistics and fulfillment company. “We saw an enormous spike in Q2, and it continued in Q3 and Q4. On-demand manufacturing and mass customization is growing faster than anyone can keep up with.”

Printful, another on-demand fulfillment company that prints, packs and ships custom products from e-commerce sites, reported an 80% year-over-year increase in order count over the last three quarters of 2020 and a 44% year-over-year growth in the number of new stores joining the platform. During the holiday shopping bonanza between Black Friday and Cyber Monday, the online printing and drop-shipping company fulfilled 25 million products. In fact, that weekend, Printful saw a 70% order increase, with as many as 204 orders per minute – twice as high as in 2019.

(Sources)

The Future: More of the Same

“I don’t think anything will revert back to the way it was before,” says Rob Watson, chief experience officer at Top 40 supplier Vantage Apparel (asi/93390), which offers its own home-grown on-demand customization service to distributors. “More distributors are getting into the space and offering a solution that end-users wanted before but never knew that distributors could offer. I don’t think this is going to go away.”

Don’t expect 2021 to rewrite the narrative for on-demand companies and promotional products firms that follow the same model – 2020 wasn’t a blip. It was merely an acceleration of what’s already been happening. Consider that Printful’s impressive numbers during the holiday shopping weekend came after an already staggering growth rate for the company, which ballooned by 441% over the three previous years – from $21 million in 2016 to $116 million in 2019.

Related article: U.S. Ecommerce Up 92.7%

Thievery Corporation

Thievery Corporation

Theft has gotten blurry. It usually is clear cut. I possess something that another covets and takes it. Shitty, but done deal.

Now, not so much. The following story (clipped and edited – the whole thing is here). This is an important post and has made me focus on what and how I sell online. To be clear and transparent in my writing, I use three different print on demand services for my products on cgk.ink. I have a few rules:

  1. I’ve made the design
  2. It is found on a royalty-free site like Unsplash. When I do this, I keep the file name which always includes the artist’s name and I have no problem disclosing that information. I always use that work to inspire me and again — alter the design with attribution.
  3. I will not download and use any work that is representational and/or figurative of another person’s style without their permission. Fine art that is legally in the public domain is fair game (if you want or can). I have far too many artist friends to piss off people.

The edited article:

Amy Crabtree is a UK graphic artist and owner of Cakes with Faces, a brand of colourful T-shirts, clothing and gifts. Recently, she found out that her artworks had been copied and sold across a host of different websites. Here she tells us about her experiences, how she fought back and how you can too.

I then discovered it was not only the Alpacalypse but my other T-shirts too. In total I found 25 cases of my designs being sold without my permission. With the exception of that first case on AliExpress, they were all print-on-demand shops. On one site alone, my design was being sold on 158 different products.

I then discovered it was not only the Alpacalypse but my other T-shirts too. In total I found 25 cases of my designs being sold without my permission. With the exception of that first case on AliExpress, they were all print-on-demand shops. On one site alone, my design was being sold on 158 different products.

Copyright for designers

In the UK, copyright protection is granted automatically when you create something. This is stated clearly on the UK government website. There’s no need to pay to register it (although that is something you can do); the copyright of your designs and artwork is yours by right.
Through various agreements, this copyright extends to other countries, including China.

Proving copyright

As a designer you’ll likely have a trail of evidence to prove the work is yours if you need to. Rough sketches aren’t dated, but they are evidence to show the design is your creation. Anything digital has a time-stamp – that includes working files on your PC, as well as any emails, tweets and Instagram posts.

In my case I also had orders from customers, documented and dated, from both my own online shop and Etsy, where there are also reviews from customers, with dates. There are articles about the Alpacalypse on third party blogs and magazines. Thanks to YouTube, I even have videos showing the T-shirts and hoodies on my booth at comic con, with publication dates. You can clearly see me wearing an Alpacalypse hoodie in a vlog from an alpaca show.

If you’re public about your work and active with self promotion – which you have to be, if you’re selling online or touting for work – you’ll likely have a whole digital trail behind you.

What to do if this happens to you

If you spot your work on a print-on-demand merchandise site, you can report it through the store. All the print-on-demand sites I dealt with had links or forms to report copyright infringement. Some even have “Report this” links on each product as standard, which is an indication of how common this issue is.

Reporting involves involves filling in forms and providing links as evidence to show that the design belongs to you. In most cases, a link to the product in my shop was sufficient. For AliExpress, the process was lengthy: I had to register with their online IP portal, which involved uploading a photo of my passport, then registering the design as my property, with proof and dates of when it was first created, published and sold. Once that’s approved, you can finally register a complaint against the counterfeit product.

To their credit, all the print-on-demand sites dealt with my complaints very quickly and efficiently. Most of the products were removed within a day, and after 48 hours there were none remaining.

However, the fact remains that filling in forms and getting proof together is a lengthy process. As a small business owner or freelancer, that’s time you don’t necessarily have. Larger brands and companies have whole legal departments to deal with these problems.

So now, do I have to search the internet periodically to check if any of my designs have been stolen? Is that something I have to add into my weekly to do list?


Amy’s Your Cake or Your Life design has also been ripped off.

Print-on-demand sites and copyright

Print-on-demand sites are ideal platforms for anyone who wants to profit from stolen artwork. Users can upload as many designs as they wish, and wait for the orders to roll in. Unlike when you produce your own merchandise, there’s no upfront investment and no financial risk. Many of the sellers that had stolen my designs had shops filled with T-shirts in so many different styles that they must have been stolen from other people. Many of the designs were clearly clipart or cringe-worthy, cheap slogans, with very little care taken over them.

Obviously it’s not the fault of the print-on-demand portals, who sent me copy and paste apologies and disclaimers saying they’re not liable for the actions of their users. Anyone can register and upload any designs they like. They simply have to tick a box saying they hold the copyright – but if you’re the kind of person who steals art you’re probably not going to have scruples about lying on an online form.

Copyright infringement of indie designers is clearly an issue. Your work has to be online in order to promote yourself – we wouldn’t be able to get work or sell products if it wasn’t. Even if you watermark art you post online, Photoshop can do anything. It’s so easy to be a victim of design theft without even knowing.

All imagery in this story is courtesy of Amy Crabtree

CUSTOM JOURNALS

CUSTOM JOURNALS

WHAT DO YOU THINK? 

“Keeping a journal of what’s going on in your life is a good way to help you distill what’s important and what’s not.”

— Martina Navratilova 

Writing is, perhaps, one of humanity’s highest achievements. Collecting your thoughts, emotions; your successes and failures allows you to meditate on a very deep level.

A custom-designed journal proudly states that you are quietly observant and mindful. It’s easy and fun to create your own personal journey. 

I’m offering 10% off journals that are custom designed. Simply fill out the info below and upload a hi-res image, illustration, photo, or tell me your favorite quote — anything, really, and I’d be happy to send you a mock-up free of charge!

Questions? Contact me.

 

FEATURES

 

90gsm Paper
 

Semi-gloss Laminated Cover
 
Casewrap Binding

UPLOAD YOUR DESIGN

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CURRENT JOURNALS

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Print-on-Demand Custom Orders

Print-on-Demand Custom Orders

The flexibility of print-on-demand (PoD) allows opportunities that have not previously been possible at scale. 

cgk.ink presents a lot of high-quality products quickly. We can do this because we have partnered with Printify to create our designs using their technology. This opens up the creative process enormously. And we want you to be a part of it.

Print-on-demand (PoD) uses various techniques to take digital images and transfer them to products with absolute precision in scale, color and sharpness. Indeed, the entire world becomes your canvas. We’ve selected to curate collections of images that make us smile, or laugh, or think. Our range is wide, but limited since we’re a small crew. We’re looking to expand!

We’d love to help you create the item of your desire. 

For example, let’s say that you’re into robots. Who isn’t? So we did a quick Google Image search and found this little guy:

Cute, right?

NOTE: always respect copyrights and don’t steal. Or you’d be a bad robot. There are tons of places online to find rights-free images -or- you can create them yourself:)

OK, so we have our raw material. Now what? Well, it’s a somewhat simple process with lots of cautions and considerations. Essentially, what happens is:

Prepare Your Design:

Things to consider are file type and size, aspect ratio, transparency, and resolution. Of course, make sure you have permission to use the image or design!

Select Your Medium:

Is this going to print on a garment? A poster? Underwear or a shower curtain? Make sure the design is appropriate for the media.

Edit Your Product:

This is where you position, crop and otherwise play with your design on the selected medium. Not all images scale to all products, so be judicious.

Publish Your Work:

Once everything looks good-to-go, it’s a simple matter of pricing and uploading to Printify’s servers. You can choose to go live immediately or do a second inspection on your ecommerce platform.

Sell Your Product:

You’ve already linked your ecommerce platform to Printify, so all the details, images, pricing and shipping are automatically added.

There’s a lot more detail to this process than I’m revealing, but the concept is solid. 

cgk.ink has lots of experience in designing, editing and preparing images and designs that play nicely with Printify’s requirements.

If you have an idea of an image or design that you’d like to see on almost any garment, houseware, decor or accessory, let’s start that conversation below! We’d love to work with you!

8 + 4 =

Hands on Ecommerce: 101

Hands on Ecommerce: 101

I write a lot about ecommerce and, indeed, working on ecommerce sites is the bulk of my business. [caption id="attachment_2282" align="alignnone" width="1024"]cgk.ink | STORE Select STORE from the top menu to begin.[/caption] So I thought it was time to demonstrate my skills in real, live, concrete ways. I’ve decided to create the cgk.ink store as a sort of teaching tool so that you can see the mechanizations and processes behind running an effective online retail store yourself. I plan on using this as a workshop of sorts where I put into play a lot of the things I talk about in concrete ways. This is a fully functioning ecommerce site and the products are very real — as will be the charge to your card if you decide to buy. Wherever you see  means that there is a pop up that explains in more detail exactly what that component does, why it’s there and resources to explore. The first installment is all about a rapidly growing type of ecommerce that is akin to drop shipping but with a twist: Direct to Garment (DTG) print fulfillment. Companies like Printify, Printful, Art in America, etc. have been around for a while. Essentially the process works like this:

  1. You select an image or design
  2. You transmit that to the selected company
  3. They take a blank item (T-shirt, plate, mug — the product list grows every day) and using their own machinery imprint the design on the item which someone has selected on your customer-facing web site.
  4. You enjoy the fact that there are no upfront costs, no inventory to keep and the printer ships and fulfills the item directly to your customer.
  5. You collect the profit which is your retail price – the manufacturer’s cost.
Sounds pretty simple. And it is, but there are several concerns to address as well as unique marketing opportunities. Which images work best? How do you optimize an image that is being displayed in a different medium? How do you price your item? Let’s explore our first steps together.]]>