19507888 7555849 image a 3 1570650276327 Human Design: Namsa Leuba

Vivid portraits shine light on Tahiti’s ‘third gender’

Published 9th October 2019
 
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On the Polynesian island of Tahiti, there is said to be something akin to a sixth sense — one that belongs to neither men nor women. Instead, it is the sole domain of the “mahu,” a community recognized as being outside the traditional male-female divide.
 
“Mahu have this other sense that men or women don’t have,” said Swiss-Guinean photographer Namsa Leuba, whose images from the island are showing at a new exhibition in London. “It is well known in (French Polynesia) that they have something special.”
 
In Tahiti, mahu are considered a third or “liminal” gender, born biologically male but recognized by peers as distinct, often from early in their lives. Their gender identity has been accepted on the island since time immemorial, and mahu traditionally play key social and spiritual roles, as guardians of cultural rituals and dances, or providers of care for children and elders.

It’s Really Unfortunate and an Annoyance That We Live According to Normatives.

Years ago, I stopped using the word “should.” All my friends, collectively, just shrugged and ordered another drink. I think I was right and would like apologies, please.

We speak of “late phase capitalism” without realizing that we use those same words for cancer.

My main issue here is that “normative” no longer holds power. O! They try to make it work.